Cool New Technology That Could Come to a Theme Park Near You!

Occasionally I run across some amazing technology that, while it may not be used a theme park yet, it very well could some day.


Take, for example, these amazing flying orbs that can be controlled via computer and can be synchronized to fly above the heads of audiences in a controlled environment. Originally, Airstage started creating these lighter-than-air machines for conventions in the shapes of cars.

Lotte World Lets Dream

The next thing you know, the Goddard Group is using them in the Let’s Dream Parade in Lotte World in South Korea. If you’ve never heard of this parade, click this link and you’ll see some amazing concept art from our friends at the Goddard Group.

3D laser projectionsAerial Burton, a Japanese company, has found a way to display lasers in mid air! You’ve probably seen other projection systems that use mist or fog as the surface, but this company has found a way to use only air to project true three dimensional displays.

Aerial Burton Laser

Their laser ionizes molecules in the air to display a message. While the messages are not complex, this is a step in that direction. Aerial Burton is working on creating a higher resolution currently, but for now is marketing the technology to be deployed for use in emergency situations. Check out the video below!

Then there is Kinetic Lights who makes a lighting system called Orbis Fly.

Orbis Fly

Through a series of winches, light bulbs are moved up and down in a grid system controlled by a central computer.



Each light can change color based on timing and can be programmed to music. The results are incredible. Check out the video below!

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Images Copyright: Theme Park University, Gary Goddard Entertainment, Airstage, Kinetic Lights, Aerial Burton


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  1. mark_h
    Posted August 29, 2015 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    The London Millennium Dome had displays from autonomous airships at the turn of the century (link to manufacturer )

    >Through a series of wenches, light bulbs are moved up and down in a grid system controlled by a central computer.

    I hope you mean Winches rather than Wenches!

    The key challenge for a lot of technology in the theme park setting is ensuring that it can withstand the amount of usage it will get. An effect used once per show in a theatre setting may not survive being used every few minutes when another group of guests visit. Theme park maintenance is a lot more difficult as there is less downtime between shows, shutting rides is not popular.

    There is the danger that if an effect stops working reliably maintenance will disconnect it if it is taking up too much of their time.

  2. jamescobalt
    Posted August 29, 2015 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    Wow. That kinetic sculpture was breathtaking.

  3. fan51
    Posted August 30, 2015 at 12:22 pm | Permalink

    Looks amazing, but they look like demonstrations at a science fair, not practical for entertainment. Each technology has a common element, they are digital objects that create images. So give us enough light dots and we have a video screen.

    • Josh Young
      Posted August 31, 2015 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

      I will refrain from showcasing technology that isn’t ready for attractions just yet. One day, these can be developed to be used in attractions. But I understand not having the foresight to see that in it’s current form. To each their own!

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